Hua Jieshi

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Hua Jieshi
JIA JIA.jpg
Photo of Hua in 2008
Born (1951-07-18) July 18, 1951 (age 71)
Occupation Human rights activist
Known for Human rights activism, Anti-communism activism
Works
Eyes of a Dissident: Terror in Communist Manchuria
Religion Manchu shamanism

Hua Jieshi (Simplified Chinese: 华杰士 Huá jié shì, born July 18th 1951) is a Manchurian humanitarian, human rights and anti-communist activist known for his works documenting the Communist Party of Manchuria and their rule over the Manchu People's Republic from 1946-1990. Born in Liaoyuan in Communist Manchuria, Hua's life was watched and monitored by the ruling Communist Party and was victim of the country's authoritarian government after his father was arrested and executed under the charge of counter-revolutionary sedition and both he and his mother were sent to a re-education camp in the countryside. Hua was released in 1967 and escaped the country fleeing to China and later to the Kingdom of Sierra where he lived in asylum from 1967 until his return in 1990 following the collapse of the communist regime during the Orchid Revolution.

Early life[edit | edit source]

Hua was born on July 18, 1951 in Liaoyuan, Longshan District during the reign of the Manchu People's Republic. His mother was a nurse who worked at a local hospital and his father was a factory worker who was close to the factory's manager. He grew up in an industrious family and his family was able to afford proper education. Growing up, Hua had admitted to being known to ask questions even on occasions where they weren't warranted and it lead him to have multiple clashes with his teachers except for one.

Life in re-education[edit | edit source]

Escape and asylum[edit | edit source]

Return to Manchuria[edit | edit source]

Activism and views[edit | edit source]

Personal life[edit | edit source]

Works[edit | edit source]

  • Escape from Red Manchuria (1968)
  • Orchids of Manchuria (1991)
  • Eyes of a Dissident: Terror in Communist Manchuria (2008)
  • Tao: Opportunism and Reform (2011)