Stellar Civilizations

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This meta-page of the Stellar Civilizations is currently under construction.

Stellar Civilizations
Genre Collaborative constructed world
Established 2019
Creator NickPro
Progress Active, ongoing
Contributors
No. of articles 1

Welcome to Stellar Civilizations (also SC or Project from now on), a collaborative roleplaying project, inspired by the video game of Stellaris. Unlike Altverse and Project Genesis, which describe a single planet, here we are working together on the galaxy of Milky Way, a spiral galaxy with about 200 billion stars.

To be continued...

The basics[edit | edit source]

This is a summary of all the types of stars, planets, and everything else which is borrowed from Stellaris. If you have never played the game, this section is going to be very useful for you.

NOTE: This is not an entirely Stellaris-based project, but rather, it is inspired by it. This means that we use the game as influence, but in cases where it is a little vague we can come up with our own definitions and terms. Basically, the Project is some sort of a middle ground between Stellaris and reality, with most of Stellaris' formalities being omitted.

Stars[edit | edit source]

There is approximately 200 billion stars in the galaxy of Milky Way, broken down into eleven classes. The classes and their descriptions are as follows:

  • The large class B main-sequence stars are very bright and blue. Although somewhat rare, the luminosity of these stars make them among the most visible to the naked eye.
  • The relatively young white or bluish-white class A main-sequence stars are typically among the most visible to the naked eye. They are large and rotate very quickly, but will eventually evolve into slower and cooler red giants.
  • F-type stars are fairly large and often referred to as yellow-white dwarves. Although they often emit significant amounts of UV radiation, their wide habitable zones have a good chance of supporting life-bearing worlds.
  • Often referred to as yellow dwarves, G-type stars actually range in color from white to slightly yellow. Main-sequence stars fuse hydrogen for roughly 10 billion years before they expand and become red giants. Although their lifespans are shorter than K-type stars, worlds inside the habitable zone of a G star often enjoy optimal conditions for the development of life.
  • Class K main-sequence stars, sometimes referred to as orange dwarves, are a fairly common sight. They are stable on the main-sequence between 15 and 70 billion years, meaning that worlds orbiting a K-type star have a longer than average window to evolve life.
  • Class M stars are the most common stars in the universe, often referred to as red dwarves. Their low luminosity means they are difficult to observe with the naked eye from afar. Although they typically have an extremely long lifespan, red dwarves emit almost no UV light resulting in unfavorable conditions for most forms of life.
  • With a large radius and comparatively low surface temperature, red giants are stars of moderate mass in a late stage of stellar evolution. Their expanded stellar atmosphere and high luminosity make for distant habitable zone orbits.
  • Brown dwarfs are substellar objects that lack the mass to sustain hydrogen fusion. Roughly the size of large gas giants, they have a much greater density. Their low luminosity and comparatively small heat generation means that planets orbiting them are unlikely to support life.
  • Pulsars are highly magnetized neutron stars that emit beams of electromagnetic radiation. As the star rotates, the radiation beam is only visible when it is pointing directly at the observer. This results in a very precise interval of pulses, which sometimes is so exact that it can be used to measure the passage of time with extreme accuracy. The radiation emitted by pulsars interferes with deflector technology, rendering ship and station shields inoperable.
  • Typically formed as a result of the collapse of a very massive star at the end of its life cycle, black holes have extremely strong gravity fields that prevent anything - including light - from escaping once the event horizon has been crossed. The gravitational waves emitted by black holes interfere with FTL drives, making it harder for ships to escape from combat.
  • Neutron stars are incredibly dense stellar remnants are sometimes created when a massive star suffers a rapid collapse and explodes in a supernova. Although their diameter is typically as little as ten kilometers, their mass is many times greater than an average G-type star. The gravitational waves and radiation emitted by Neutron Stars must be carefully navigated around, slowing the sublight speed of ships.

The exact number of stars of each class is to be determined.

Hyperlanes[edit | edit source]

Planets[edit | edit source]

Civilizations[edit | edit source]

Rules[edit | edit source]

Contributors[edit | edit source]

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Stars & star systems[edit | edit source]

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Planets & moons[edit | edit source]

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Empires & local-government areas[edit | edit source]

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Races and civilizations[edit | edit source]

Minors[edit | edit source]

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To be approved[edit | edit source]

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List of known civilizations[edit | edit source]

Spacefaring[edit | edit source]

Primitive[edit | edit source]

Extinct[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]